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The Science Behind Why Love Is A Powerful Drug

There’s a certain type of love we all crave and chase. We want it to be all-consuming. We want to think about our partners all day and night.

We want to be love sick to the point of nausea. We’ve seen that type of love on television, and we’ve been moved by songs written about it.

Blair Thill on LOVE HURTS  | Elite Daily on Facebook

Once we experience love our desire for it only increases. We remember the euphoria of being intimately tied to another human being, and we want to recapture that feeling. It’s difficult to articulate what, exactly, that feels like. Well, it’s almost as if love is a drug, and you want another hit. That sounds crazy but, believe it or not, there’s science to back it up. Falling in love stimulates the same part of the brain as an actual drug. In the moments immediately following the use of an illicit drug like cocaine, the brain’s levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine skyrocket, causing feelings of euphoria. The ‘high’ of the high. Yet it seems that the initial stages of love offer a similar (albeit legal) kind of high. Helen Fisher, an anthropologist whose work focuses on relationships, has studied this phenomenon. Her research has found that, when you fall in love, serotonin lifts your confidence levels, norepinephrine boosts your energy and dopamine enhances feelings of pleasure. In simpler terms: You feel like you’re on top of the world when you’re falling in love. Read More


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